osteochondral lesion

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---Topic: osteochondral lesion started by milley

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milley
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Dec. 23 2004,19:04

Ok  can you put this in layman terms for me, lol, and is this why my foot is still killing me! fluid adjacent to either the posterior tibial tendon or flexor digitorum longus tendon. findings suspicious osteochondral lesion involving the articulating surface of the talus at the talocalcaneal joint. small bone cyst involving proximal forth metatarsal. edema involving soft tissue. effusion involving the ankle mortise and talocalcaneal joint. suggest ankle mri. other than that my foot is fine. lol
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Dr Foot




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Jan. 2003
Dec. 31 2004,12:50

I will try but this is difficult so I would ask your specialist to explain this to you!

Osteochondral lesions are rare joint disorders which can affect the talus. The articulating surface of the talus at the talocalcaneal joint is the joint that the talus (click here to view diagram < http://www.drfoot.co.uk/anatomy.htm) > and the heel bone connect.  

"fluid adjacent to either the posterior tibial tendon or flexor digitorum longus tendon" refers to fluid on the inner aspect of the foot. The posterior tibial tendon is the tendon that supports the inner arch and the flexor digitorum longus tendon comes from the tibia in the leg and attaches to the lesser toes which causes your lesser toes (2.3.4.5) to flex.

"Small bone cyst involving proximal forth metatarsal. edema involving soft tissue. effusion involving the ankle mortise and talocalcaneal joint. " A bone cyst is a common, benign, fluid-containing lesion and can be caused by pressure, basically a sack of fluid on the bone. The proximal forth metatarsal is the bottom of the fourth toe and edema is swelling of the tissue basically a swelling reaction on the base of the fourth toe.
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